Materials for cold forming

 

  Materials for cold forming

  The best material for cold forming a part may not be the same material you would use to machine it. The cold-forming company or your material supplier can work with you to determine the correct alloy for your part when it is cold formed. “Material flow and ductility are very key issues,” said Hughes. Knowledge of the behavior of materials can make the difference between a successful transition to cold forming and a frustrating experiment. Your cold-forming house will advise you, and you should be open to their recommendations. Any sulfur content in the metal would be detrimental to the heading process, for example. The qualities sulfur gives to a free-machining alloy make the material more likely to fracture during the cold forming process. So a material such as Type 303 free-machining stainless would not work. However, 302 HQ (heading quality) would be ideal. The material should be as soft as possible, ordered annealed at finish.

  The other thing to look for in material for cold forming is a large yield-to-tensile strength ratio. This would allow you to put in more cold work before the part fractures, Hughes said.